Try A Fitness Boot Camp 30 Day Challenge For A Healthier Lifestyle

Getting healthy is easy, and it doesn’t take very long to notice the difference. Joining a fitness boot camp is one of the things you can do to help you achieve your fitness goals. Before you begin however, you must decide, and make a commitment towards this goal. Staying fit and healthy is a lifestyle choice. Once you make this commitment, you will start to see how small changes in your daily routine can help get you into shape. When you sit down with your fitness boot camp trainer to create your diet and workout plan, you need to remember to set goals that are simple and realistic. Achieving these and seeing their results will help motivate you move on to bigger goals, with bigger results.

Fitness boot camp 30-day challenge

Celebrities and models make it seem like they were born with good looks, but any certified fitness boot camp trainer will tell you that the secret to their good look – and yours, is a combination of a healthy diet and regular fitness workout. You don’t have to work out like crazy, but making health-conscious decisions about your lifestyle will certainly go a long way. Here are some fitness boot camp tips that will have you feeling healthier at the end of 30 days.

  1. Drink lots of water. Hydration is important. It also helps stave off those untimely hunger pangs.
  2. Quit smoking and reduce alcohol consumption.
  3. Stand straight. Shoulders back, tummy tucked in fitness boot camp style. This will help tone your abdominals and give you a taller, more confident feel.
  4. Watch what you eat. Talk to a camp trainer about what type of diet you can start off on. Generally, we’d encourage you to avoid calorie and sugar-rich rood and try to get more fruits and greens into your system.
  5. Brush regularly, especially before bedtime. This acts like a signal to your brain that it is time to stop eating.
  6. Don’t lose sleep. Not getting the rest your body needs can make your body start producing more fat.
  7. Exercise. Start off light at first, like perhaps walking the kids to school, walking to work when the weather’s good, taking the stairs, mowing the lawn. Your backyard is a great place to exercise a little. Pushups, sit-ups, skipping rope – all help tone your body and keep the fat at bay. A fitness boot camp trainer can help you identify areas where you can start to incorporate physical activity into your daily routine.

And that’s the 30 day challenge. Follow these with dedication and commitment for just 30 days and you will start to see the changes in your body AND your mood. Ask a camp trainer to also help you start a journal of the 30-day challenge. Seeing the changes happen helps keep you positive and committed to your fitness program. And as fitness boot camp trainers like to put it: getting healthy is a lifestyle choice. We encourage you to make this choice not just for yourself, but for those around you. One person keeping fit is an inspiration for others to keep fit. Start getting healthy today.

A Dance Based School Trip to Learn the Capoeira

When you think of a school trip focused around dance and learning more about the different styles, you may not immediately think of taking students to a lake in Italy. But with its close proximity to some of the major Italian cities and a stunning setting, Lake Garda is an ideal place to learn about dance – Capoeira, specifically.

Situated in the northern part of the country between Milan and Venice, Lake Garda is the largest lake in Italy. Fringed by numerous towns and villages, it is a vibrant and creative region. Students on a dance focused school trip to Lake Garda can learn about the wonderful Capoeira form of dance – its history, its moves and its intricate relationship with martial arts.

Capoeira

Originating in Brazil, probably in the 16th century, Capoeira is a form of artistic expression combining music with dance in a way that evolved from the movements of traditional Brazilian natives and African slaves. Over the years, Capoeira was used not only as a dance, but as a martial arts style of movement. It was adopted by a variety of bodyguards and fighters as it gained recognition across the country. Since the 1970s, while hip-hop was forming in New York City, Capoeira was moving away from Brazil and across the world, and it has since gained massive momentum.

The moves

The moves of Capoeira can be broken down in to three main ones: the ginga, the attacks and the defence. The ginga is the motion of rocking back and forth. In doing this, it keeps the Capoeirista in motion so that they do not get stuck in a still state and become an easy target for their opponent. Students must also learn about attacks and how and when to use them. Most of the moves involved in an attack are completed using the legs and the knees, with the long round-kicks playing a big role in most of the direct hits and takedowns. In defence, the Capoeirista is not focused on blocking the attack so much as moving to avoid the attack, and this is where the basic movement of the ginga comes into play. The avoidances are called esquivas, and are made by moving, bending, and leaning on the floor, and a Capoeirista should only block the hit if avoiding it is impossible.

An experience abroad on a school trip

While the basic moves of Capoeira can, of course, be learned in a studio setting in the UK, travelling on a school trip to a foreign country to learn more about this, and other, dances can be an invaluable experience for young, up-and-coming performers. In a different context, and with varying cultural differences, any form of dance can take on new meaning for performers. As well as assisting in their creative evolution, students can explore a new culture, meet new people and extend their education beyond a mere classroom situation.

A Dance Based School Trip to Learn the Capoeira

When you think of a school trip focused around dance and learning more about the different styles, you may not immediately think of taking students to a lake in Italy. But with its close proximity to some of the major Italian cities and a stunning setting, Lake Garda is an ideal place to learn about dance – Capoeira, specifically.

Situated in the northern part of the country between Milan and Venice, Lake Garda is the largest lake in Italy. Fringed by numerous towns and villages, it is a vibrant and creative region. Students on a dance focused school trip to Lake Garda can learn about the wonderful Capoeira form of dance – its history, its moves and its intricate relationship with martial arts.

Capoeira

Originating in Brazil, probably in the 16th century, Capoeira is a form of artistic expression combining music with dance in a way that evolved from the movements of traditional Brazilian natives and African slaves. Over the years, Capoeira was used not only as a dance, but as a martial arts style of movement. It was adopted by a variety of bodyguards and fighters as it gained recognition across the country. Since the 1970s, while hip-hop was forming in New York City, Capoeira was moving away from Brazil and across the world, and it has since gained massive momentum.

The moves

The moves of Capoeira can be broken down in to three main ones: the ginga, the attacks and the defence. The ginga is the motion of rocking back and forth. In doing this, it keeps the Capoeirista in motion so that they do not get stuck in a still state and become an easy target for their opponent. Students must also learn about attacks and how and when to use them. Most of the moves involved in an attack are completed using the legs and the knees, with the long round-kicks playing a big role in most of the direct hits and takedowns. In defence, the Capoeirista is not focused on blocking the attack so much as moving to avoid the attack, and this is where the basic movement of the ginga comes into play. The avoidances are called esquivas, and are made by moving, bending, and leaning on the floor, and a Capoeirista should only block the hit if avoiding it is impossible.

An experience abroad on a school trip

While the basic moves of Capoeira can, of course, be learned in a studio setting in the UK, travelling on a school trip to a foreign country to learn more about this, and other, dances can be an invaluable experience for young, up-and-coming performers. In a different context, and with varying cultural differences, any form of dance can take on new meaning for performers. As well as assisting in their creative evolution, students can explore a new culture, meet new people and extend their education beyond a mere classroom situation.